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Spiritual support and psychological well-being: older adults

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Religion, spirituality and/or belief were also found to provide social support, connectedness to others and a sense of belonging to a community for older adults in general, older adults with physical health conditions [5,38,41], and older adults with mental health conditions including anxiety and depression and dementia.The population of older adults in the United States is steadily rising. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a call to reduce mental distress in older adults. Research shows that mental distress is associated with depressive symptoms, which are significantly related to many chronic medical conditions, functional impairment, suicide, and all-cause mortality.Topic: Older adults, spirituality and religion · Briefly describe the chosen topic: · Identify micro level of understanding about this group. · Explain and describe what would peak a clinical social workers’ interest in this group. · Analyze differentiation in diversity for the selected population.equate it with religion. Religion and spirituality are different. When viewing spirituality in the nursing perspective, it is significant to ascertain how spiritual care is to be taught and determine ways for implementation. Just as food and rest are universal needs, so are spiritual needs (Gallia, 1996).The role of spirituality and religion has interested researchers in gerontology over the last 30 years, particularly because spirituality and religion in the elderly are essential issues to consider insofar as they can have a positive role in individuals’ health and well-being (Koenig et al., Reference Koenig, King and Carson 2012).Hodge, Bonifas, Chou/SPIRITUALITY AND OLDER ADULTS 4 with spirituality, which is often a highly personal and sensitive subject among clients (Hodge, 2006a). Older adults may be particularly sensitive to breaches of client self-determination due to the importance they often ascribe to spirituality (Lewis, 2001). Autonomy can be violated in many.Older adults often have distinct spiritual needs that may overlap with but are not the same as psychologic needs. Ascertaining a patient’s spiritual needs can help mobilize the necessary resources (eg, spiritual counseling or support groups, participation in religious activities, social contacts from members of a religious community).In the United States, more than 90% of older people consider themselves religious or spiritual. About 6 to 10% are atheists and do not depend on religious or spiritual practices or traditions to provide meaning. The level of religious participation is greater among older people than among any other age group.The obvious effects of spirituality and religion related to health of older people make it an important domain for further study. Religion and spirituality in older adults.

Seniors and Spirituality: Health Benefits of Faith - Elder

  1. Hodge Spirituality and Older Adults Final
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Religion and Spirituality in Older People - SeniorsMatter

Religion and spirituality Religion and spirituality often play a vital role in people’s lives, and this may be especially true for the elderly. More than 90% of elderly people identify themselves as being religious/spiritual. There are numerous mental and physical benefits to being religious and/or spiritual with but a few caveats.Aging & Mental Health Vol. 15, No. 3, April 2011, 334–343 Older adults’ preferences for religion/spirituality in treatment for anxiety and depression Melinda A. Stanleyabc*, Amber L. Busha, Mary E. Campb, John P. Jamesonac, Laura L. Phillipscd, Catherine R. Barberb, Darrell Zenoa, James W. Lomaxb and Jeffrey A. Cullyabc a Health Services Research and Development Center of Excellence.The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which spousal dementia caregivers and other older adults rely on religion and spirituality as coping resources. A total of 52 Christian.This study examined the role of religion on the clinical and social well-being of older adults (55 and older) with schizophrenia. Religion has been conceptualized in various ways. Spirituality refers to viewing one's self as part of a larger spiritual force—for example, the sacred, transcendent, or ultimate reality ( 1, 5, 6).spirituality/religion into counseling for anxiety and depression was desirable. John P. Jameson, Melinda A. Stanley, Amber L. Bush, Mary E. Camp, Laura L. Phillips, Catherine R religion and spirituality in older adults. Barber, Darrell Zeno, James W. Lomax and Jeffrey A. Cully (2011) "Older Adults’ Preferences ForThe role of spirituality and religion has interested researchers in gerontology over the last 30 years, particularly because spirituality and religion in the elderly are essential issues to consider insofar as they can have a positive role in individuals’ health and well-being (Koenig et al., Reference Koenig, King and Carson 2012).Spiritual but Not Religious The assumption that people become more religious as they age and confront their mortality is generally regarded as a myth among professionals who work with older adults, according to Holly Nelson-Becker, author of Spirituality, Religion and Aging: Illuminations for Therapeutic Practice (2018).The obvious effects of spirituality and religion related to health of older people make it an important domain for further study.ceptualizes the connection between spirituality and older age more in terms of constraints and adversity than of the growth process. Atchley (1997), for exam-ple, suggests that ageism and age discrimination push many older adults to spirituality, presumably by fos-tering disengagement and curtailing life choices. Fur- Religion and spirituality in older adults.

Religion and Spirituality in Older People - Older People’s

Background: Religious and spiritual issues are clearly important to the older adult population and may play a positive role in maintaining health and recovering from illness.We conducted semi-structured interviews with 46 surrogate decision makers for hospitalized older adults to characterize the role of spirituality and religion in decision making. Three themes emerged: (1) religion as a guide to decision making, (2) control, and (3) faith, death and dying. For religious surrogates, religion played a central role in end of life decisions. There was variability.Chaplains working in residential settings for older adults will find an April 2019 article in the Journal of Religion and Health by David Drummond and Lindsay B. Carey very interesting. The authors review the literature regarding spiritual screening, history-taking, and assessment and advocate for the development of a brief instrument for.Spirituality often brings a built-in community, which impacts health, happiness and longevity. Religion and spirituality for the elderly with dementia appear to slow cognitive decline, help them use better coping strategies, and have a better quality of life. Spirituality also helps people find purpose, and reduce anxiety and depressive symptoms.The obvious effects of spirituality and religion related to health of older people make it an important domain for further study.Age: Older individuals identify religion/spirituality as being more important in their lives than those younger (Beit-Hallahmi & Argyle, 1998) religion and spirituality in older adults. This age difference has been explained by several factors including that religion and spirituality assist older individuals in coping with age- related losses, provide opportunities for socialization.Increasing longevity in the modern society puts the spiritual needs of older adults at the forefront of immediate societal needs. The impact of religion and spirituality on mental health has.The role of spirituality and religion has interested researchers in gerontology over the last 30 years, particularly because spirituality and religion in the elderly are essential issues to consider insofar as they can have a positive role in individuals’ health and well-being (Koenig et al., Reference Koenig, King and Carson 2012).And the benefits of finding faith as an adult go beyond life satisfaction, according to research on the subject: Religion and spirituality are also linked to better physical health. Religion and spirituality in older adults.

Religion and Spirituality in Older Adults - Geriatrics - MSD

Hodge, Bonifas, Chou/SPIRITUALITY AND OLDER ADULTS 4 with spirituality, which is often a highly personal and sensitive subject among clients (Hodge, 2006a). Older adults may be particularly sensitive to breaches of client self-determination due to the importance they often ascribe to spirituality (Lewis, 2001). Autonomy can be violated in many.Spirituality is a significant part of many people’s lives, and it can become even more important as we grow older. A study by the University of Chicago found belief in god tends to increase with age, especially for those older than 68. Luckily for these spiritual seniors, faith practices come with a host of health benefits.Religiosity and spirituality has been shown to relate to depressive and anxiety outcomes, particularly among older persons (Bergin, 1983, Braam et al., 1999, Koenig, 1989, Koenig, 2013, Koenig, 1998, Lucchetti et al., 2011a, Mueller et al., 2001, Seybold and Hill, 2001).Older adults may feel that becoming involved with religion or spirituality will offer them support or companionship. Speaking with a religious leader, such as a pastor, can provide comfort to those who are sick or lonely. It may also provide hope for those who suffering from a chronic illness, are grieving a loss or trying to overcome religion and spirituality in older adults.Spirituality & Aging in Modern Society. Increasing longevity in modern society puts the spiritual needs of older adults at the forefront of societal priorities in providing care for the elderly.Background: Religious and spiritual issues are clearly important to the older adult population and may play a positive role in maintaining health and recovering from illness.Topic: Older adults, spirituality and religion · Briefly describe the chosen topic: · Identify micro level of understanding about this group. · Explain and describe what would peak a clinical social workers’ interest in this group. · Analyze differentiation in diversity for the selected population.In the United States, more than 90% of older people consider themselves religious or spiritual. About 6 to 10% are atheists and do not depend on religious or spiritual practices or traditions to provide meaning. The level of religious participation is greater among older people than among any other age group.Religion is not always beneficial to older adults. Religious devotion may promote excessive guilt, inflexibility, and anxiety. Religious preoccupations and delusions may develop in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or psychoses. Religion and spirituality in older adults.

A Guide to Exploring Religious Faith as an Adult - The Atlantic

specifically on older adults, despite research indicating that being both religious and spiritual is related to better well-being in older adults (e.g., Krause and Wulff 2005). We incorporated Hill et al.'s (2000) conceptual definitions of religion and spirituality as a theoretical guide and an initial starting point for our research.A growing body of literature suggests that religion and spirituality can help older adults to maintain and recover both physical and mental health.Aging & Mental Health Vol. 15, No. 3, April 2011, 334–343 Older adults’ preferences for religion/spirituality in treatment for anxiety and depression Melinda A. Stanleyabc*, Amber L. Busha, Mary E. Campb, John P. Jamesonac, Laura L. Phillipscd, Catherine R. Barberb, Darrell Zenoa, James W. Lomaxb and Jeffrey A. Cullyabc a Health Services Research and Development Center of Excellence.Religion is not always beneficial to older adults. Religious devotion may promote excessive guilt, inflexibility, and anxiety. Religious preoccupations and delusions may develop in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or psychoses.Religion and spirituality Religion and spirituality often play a vital role in people’s lives, and this may be especially true for the elderly. More than 90% of elderly people identify themselves as being religious/spiritual. There are numerous mental and physical benefits to being religious and/or spiritual with but a few caveats.Religion and spirituality can play an important role in guiding the lives of older adults as well as helping them establish meaning in their lives and to cope with adverse situations.Abstract An understanding of the role of religion and spirituality in the mental health of older adults is needed to better treat and work with such populations so that they can prepare themselves Religion and spirituality in older adults.

Spirituality, religiosity, aging and health in global